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Review Article
Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency
Clin Pediatr Hematol Oncol 2015;22:1-7.
Published online April 30, 2015
© 2015 Korean Society of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology

Jae Min Lee, M.D.

Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea
Correspondence to:

Jae Min Lee
Department of Pediatrics,
Yeungnam University Hospital, 170,
Hyeonchung-ro, Nam-gu, Daegu
705-802, Korea
Tel: +82-53-620-3530
Fax: +82-53-629-2252
E-mail: mopic@hanmail.net

Received October 10, 2014; Revised November 21, 2014; Accepted December 30, 2014.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzyme disorder. There are more than 400 million people worldwide with G6PD deficiency, and its distribution is similar to that of malaria. G6PD deficiency is an X-linked recessive disorder. Most patients with G6PD deficiency may be asymptomatic throughout their lives. They may present as neonatal jaundice, or acute and chronic hemolysis. The most important point in the management of G6PD deficiency is to avoid oxidative stress. The prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Korea is about 0.9%. However, a nationwide survey has revealed that the number of patients with enzymopathy is increasing. Immigration of different ethnicities into Korea, and the rise of interracial marriages will likely lead to an increase in the number of patients with G6PD deficiency.
Keywords: Congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, Favism, G6PD deficiencies, Splenectomy, Neonatal jaundice, Congenital hemolytic anemia
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